Florida Lady Bird Deed Form

Lady Bird Deed (LBD) Form is one of the documents pertaining to an estate in the USA. Florida is one of the five states where this document is legal. The Florida Lady Bird Deed Form is similar to an enhanced life estate deed, providing control over a property for the whole life.

Once an estate owner fills out the lady bird deed, they can forget about any court proceedings connected with a will, can evict people living on their property, and can regulate any process related to the estate. The property owner can also transfer it to a chosen person without probate, but the recipient must wait for the owner to pass away. The involved parties are named as follows:

  • Grantee—the one receiving the property
  • Grantor—the owner of the property

Learn more about deed forms in our comprehensive guide – https://formspal.com/deed-forms/.

Lady Bird Deed Laws and Requirements in Florida

There is no special law for Lady Bird Deed in Florida. However, the courts and other third parties can terminate the deed under the following conditions:

  • If the Lady Bird Deed Form is signed to deny children inheritance while leaving the estate for siblings, some insurance companies will not agree to authorize this document. Also, if there is more than one grantee, all of them should be included in the LBD form.
  • According to the homestead law of Florida, section 732.401 of statutes, the Lady Bird Deed Form would be null and void if there is a spouse or a child of the dead owner. The property will be given to the spouse and some interests to children in such cases.

Recording Florida Lady Bird Deed Form

After filling out the Florida Lady Bird Deed Form, you should record it to make it officially valid. The recording is not required when you complete the form, but it can be terminated if you apply it without recording it.

Do not be afraid that you cannot change the Lady Bird Deed after recording it—you can always amend it or terminate its validity.

You can record Lady Bird Deed Form through the clerk of court for a fee amounting to $28. Remember to write the property owner’s name, the address of the estate, and its identification number into the recording.

Signing Requirements

You should follow the procedure of completing the Lady Bird Deed to ensure its validity in the future. Therefore,  two witnesses should sign the form besides the grantee.

Moreover, a notary public should confirm this procedure by signing and stamping the paper. Make sure all names are printed clearly to avoid problems with authorities.

Fees for Florida Lady Bird Deed Form

As there is no official law regulating the Lady Bird Deed in Florida, people usually hire an attorney to create this document. The services of attorneys are different in their scope and price. The average cost for an attorney’s work equals about $200 without payments for recording.

You can use our trusted software to build Florida Lady Bird Deed on our website to meet the requirements of insurance companies.

How to Fill Out and File a Lady Bird Deed in Florida

There are several steps you should not miss while creating a Lady Bird Deed in Florida.

  • Make sure the right upper corner on the first page of the form is empty. The size of the empty square should be equal to 3×3 inches. You also should leave blank the 1×3 inches part of the sheet on the pages that follow. These blank spaces are used for recording notes.
  • You should not write your social security number into this form.
  • Enter the price of the estate into the Lady Bird Deed Form.

The procedure of filling out the Florida Lady Bird Deed Form is as follows:

1. Identify Yourself

Provide information about the person preparing the form.

2. Date the Document

Enter the date of signing, name, and physical address of both grantor and grantee.

3. Add Property Description

Describe the property in detail.

4. Append Signatures

Sign the document and write the names of the grantor, grantee, and the witnesses.

5. Identify the Place

Write the county where the form is signed.

6. Notarize the Document

Leave a space for the notary public’s notes.

Published: May 12, 2021