Florida Trailer Bill of Sale Form

The completion of the Florida trailer bill of sale (known as Form HSMV 82050 for vehicles and vessels) is a necessary precondition for legalizing the private sale of a trailer in this U.S. state. A trailer is regarded as any appliance that can be mounted on a motor vehicle for the transportation or storage of a boat, vessel, or any other large object. The document is completed by the buyer and seller to include all the identifying information about the transaction parties, about the item being sold, its condition, date, and conditions of the sale, as well as the price at which the item is sold. The bill of sale should be notarized to possess legal power in Florida.

Florida bill of sale forms – find out more about bills of sale that can be used for different property types in the State of Florida.

Registering a Trailer in Florida

Florida laws require that all trailers are officially registered. All of them have their separate VINs, so they are included in the Florida Register. The titling requirement is not universal for all trailers, meaning that only those weighing over 2,000 pounds should have a title. Visit your local weigh station to determine the weight of your trailer and learn what registration documents it requires.

For the registration of used trailers obtained in a private sale transaction, the new owner should present the following documents:

  • An adequately filled bill of sale template
  • Registration data of the previous owner (the data may be taken from the bill of sale if it contains the previous owner’s TIN or their license plate number)
  • State-issued personal ID copy
  • A receipt of paid fees and taxes for trailer registration

These requirements are valid for the trailers registered in Florida. Those who purchase trailers outside of the state and wish to register them in Florida for the first time should provide some additional documentation.

Even if your trailer documents do not contain this information, you can simplify the registration process by asking your seller to include the TIN, make, year, and certified weight into the bill of sale for your local authority to elicit that data from the bill of sale form during registration.

If you have no weight slip and need to have your new trailer weighed at one of the Florida stations, you can apply for temporary plates. The service costs $5 and is active for ten days. Only a TIN is required for getting temporary plates.

Florida owners can even register homemade trailers. To do so, they need to provide the year of construction, certified weight slip, and state ID documents to the local transportation authority. For vehicles less than 2,000 pounds, the TIN will be generated automatically by a computer system. The Florida Division of Motorist Services should register those weighing 2,000 or more pounds.

Template Preview
Download your fillable Bill of Sale template in PDF, .doc, or .odt formats

How to write Florida Trailer Bill of Sale

The details listed here are based upon our custom bill of sale form. We strongly advise using the local official version if possible.

Step 1: Specify the bill of sale creation date.

Step 2: Enter the information for each party (buyer and seller):

  • Full name
  • Street
  • City
  • State
  • Postal code
  • Cell phone number
  • Email

Step 3: Enter the descriptive particulars of the trailer:

  • Manufacturer
  • Model
  • Year
  • Сolor
  • Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)

Step 4: Select the way in which the purchaser will pay for the trailer and for what amount.

This part also requires providing the date of the transaction and the entire amount agreed upon by each party of the transaction. You should also mark the sale method the buyer will opt for:

  1. Giving the whole amount as one transaction. This is pretty straightforward: the seller receives the full amount from the buyer in one payment and presents the trailer to the purchaser within the same day.
  2. A number of payments. With this particular method, you have to indicate the dates when the purchaser must deliver the initial and the last payments, as well as their amounts.

And after that, indicate how the purchaser will pay:

  • Cash
  • Cheque
  • Cashier’s check
  • Money order

The last thing to do in this part would be to determine whether or not all applicable taxes are included in the final cost.

Step 5: Read through the miscellaneous terms.

These generally say that the buyer obtains the object sold in “as-is” condition and is liable for it after the transaction is finished.

Step 6: Sign the document.

In the majority of states, the signature of the buyer is not necessary. Nevertheless, you’re more protected from legal problems if all sides sign the document. As an insurance policy, the buyer and seller can find a person who’ll witness the transaction and sign the document too.

Step 7: Notarize the form

Notarization is usually not necessary, but it can be a decent approach to add an additional layer of legal protection to your agreement.

In many states, a bill of sale form can be requested during title change, so the buyer needs to keep the original. There are two approaches here: you should either complete and sign two identical bills of sale or make a copy for the seller to store.

Published: Sep 16, 2020