Kinship Tree Diagram PDF Details

Kinship diagrams are tools used by geneticists, anthropologists and others who work with family trees to visually represent relationships between individuals. The kinship tree diagram form allows you to enter information about a person and their relatives, and then create a visual representation of the family tree. This can be helpful for tracking down genetic disorders or researching your ancestry. There are many online tools that allow you to create kinship tree diagrams, but some software programs also offer this functionality.

If you want to first find out how much time you will need to complete the kinship tree diagram and the number of pages it's got, here's some general information that may be of use.

QuestionAnswer
Form NameKinship Tree Diagram
Form Length2 pages
Fillable?No
Fillable fields0
Avg. time to fill out30 sec
Other nameshow to make a kinship diagram, online kinship diagram maker, how to make kinship diagram, kinship chart maker

Form Preview Example

Zaza Kinship Terminlogy and Structure (Region of Çermik / Gerger / Siverek)

 

 

 

bakal

 

 

 

dapir5

 

 

 

 

bakal

 

 

 

 

 

dapir6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V: bao

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V: bao

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

xal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'em

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

xalceni

 

 

xalı

merdey

 

 

 

niyajık

V: dayê,

 

 

 

 

ded

V: bao

 

 

 

 

V: 'emê

 

'em

 

 

dayık

V: xalo

 

 

 

 

 

 

V: xalê

 

V: dedo V: niyajê

(keko)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'emkeyna

deza

dedkeyna

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'emza

 

 

 

 

 

xalza

 

 

xalkeyna

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

xalza

(dedza)6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tew-

 

trûya

 

reyo pil

 

pir

tırû

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mêrdey

 

tewre

 

 

xalda mı

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

xalkeyna

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

balduz

ceniya

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

enıste 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

bacanax

 

tewri

 

tewre

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bıra

bıraceni

wa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mêrde

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V: keko4,

zama

 

ez

 

ceni

V: mêrdek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V: wayê

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bıra, bırak

 

 

 

= EGO

 

V: ceneki

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lajê

keynay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

balduz-

balduzda

lajê

 

keynay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

da mı

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tewredê

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tew-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hêgan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

veyv

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bırakeyna

hêgan

 

laj

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

redê mı

 

 

bırarza

(wareza)

 

 

 

 

 

keyna

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

V: veyvê

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(wareza )

 

 

V: lajo

 

 

 

V: keynê

 

 

zama

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I” (EGO), male

female

male

married

father's bloodline (Zazaki: sılale)

in-laws (Zazaki: kıta vıtewra)

V:form of address or vocative (if different from nominative)

torın

torın

torın

torın

 

 

 

Notes:

 

1mêrde

“husband”; mêrdey mı = my husband (if EGO is female)

2enıste

If EGO is female, the husband of the sister is called enıste (instead of zama)

3wareza

The old Zaza-form (in parenthesis) is rarely used today; hêgan is a Turkish loan.

4keko

May be used to address older brother and father.

5dapir

The grandmother may be addressed with dapir or with dayık, dayê (see “mother”).

6deza

The short form deza is derived from ded-za according to mother tongue speakers.

Additions to kinship terms:

xalo, xalê, dedo “uncle, aunt” may be used to address elders respectfully who

 

are not family related.

deza

2nd or 3rd cousins of father's bloodline are also called deza.

The following terms are not listed in the diagram:

demari

“step mother”

weni

how wifes call each other in polygamous marriages.

gorım

how wife of EGO calls sister of EGO.

cêri

how wife of EGO and wife of EGOS brother call each

 

other.

Description of the kinship pattern

Zaza society1 is organized patrilinearly and patrilocally. This means that lineage depends exclusively on the father not the mother. Relatives on the mother's side including the mother herself are in-laws, not blood relatives. The father's blood line is called “sılaley mı” or “merdımê mı” ('my people').

Children of the daughter are not considered to be of one's blood line, they belong to the lineage of the daughter's husband (i.e. the son in law) instead. This explains the joy over the birth of a son. A male descendant guarantees the continuation of one's paternal lineage. It is noteworthy that this fact is not represented in the terminology. Both descendants of the son and of the daughter are called “torın” (turkish torun).

As an outward expression of this structure of the society, the bride moves into the house of the groom at the wedding (patrilocal residence). The relatives of the wife, the in-laws, are called “kıta vıtewra” ('in-law side') collectively.

1This summary is based on research among Sunni Zaza, living in the region of Çermik, Gerger and Siverek. The results are based on interviews with various Zaza families.

2If maternal and paternal relatives are considered equally in determining one's lineage, individuals have overlapping lineages to which they belong. This kind of pattern is called a bilateral descent, and is displayed in a typical modern Western European society.

If there are problems or dissent among the relatives of a blood line, all members are held responsible. Problems of the in-laws are of no concern to one's blood relatives. These clear lines of understanding make it easier to live together.

Zaza society shows a pattern of unilineal descent, as each individual can be part of only one blood line.2

Marriage

When looking for a suitable marriage partner, Zaza society prefers partners of one's own blood line (endogamous marriage). The advantage of an endogamous marriage is that the descendants of the daughters will not be considered members of a different blood line, but will be considered relatives. This way, one's clan increases in number and gains more influence in society.

The disadvantage of an endogamous marriage is obvious when the marriage is not successful. Dissent and division within the clan cannot be avoided and hurt the group as a whole in the long run.

Exogamous marriages are frequent in Zaza culture as well. The advantage is seen in that disagreements between the spouses will not threaten the unity of one's clan, because the wife belongs to a different lineage.

Source:

Ember, Carol R. / Ember, Melvin. 1993. Cultural Anthropology.

Prentice Hall, New Jersey.

©Brigitte Werner, 2009. Kontakt: forum-dimli@gmx.net

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