Free Kansas Last Will and Testament Form

A will is a legally binding document that expresses the testator’s final wish in the form prescribed by law and ascertains the lawful distribution of the will creator’s property subsequently after their demise.

It is generally recommended that you prepare a last will and testament. Even when you do not have a lot of assets, free will forms might help your family situation and turn out to be vital to your household upon your death.

Here, we provide a free downloadable Kansas last will and testament form and solutions to numerous frequent questions you might have relating to this particular document.

Kansas Last Will Laws and Requirements

Requirements State laws
Signing requirement Two witnesses 59-606. Execution and attestation; self-proved wills and codicils; affidavits; form
Age of testator 18 and older 59-601. Who may make will
Age of witnesses 18 and older 59-607. Competency of witness
Self-proving wills Allowed 59-606. Execution and attestation; self-proved wills and codicils; affidavits; form
Handwritten wills Might be recognized if witnessed according to state law
Oral wills Recognized under certain circumstances 59-608. Nuncupative will
Holographic wills Not recognized 59-606. Execution and attestation; self-proved wills and codicils; affidavits; form

How to Write a Kansas Last Will and Testament

    1. Consider your possibilities. One thing to think about, first, is if you would like to write the entire document by hand or try a fillable Kansas will form available online.
    2. Specify your information. Fill in your full name and address (the city, county, and state of residence) to establish the testator of the last will and testament. Go over the remaining part of the section, including the information you have written along with the “Expenses and Taxes” subsection.
    3. Appoint the executor (or executrix). Choose the executor of your property and enter their particulars: full legal name and place of residence, which will normally be in the same state the testator lives considering that nearly all states impose special regulations on out-of-state executors. Although not mandatory, it’s a wise decision to choose an additional person to perform the duty of an executor in the event the first one is unwilling or incapable of executing your last will and testament.
    4. Establish the guardian (optional). It’s possible to appoint a trusted person as a guardian in case you’ve got minor or dependent children that need to be taken care of. In case there are no directions pertaining to what person should look after your kids, the guardian will be chosen by the court.
    5. Specify your beneficiaries. This is where you indicate those who will receive your assets. For every beneficiary, indicate the following particulars: full legal name, address, and the way they are related to you.
    6. Distribute possessions. Write down your belongings and describe the way you wish to distribute them among your beneficiaries in case you’ve got something on your mind aside from dividing the estate commensurately. Assets may include cash, stocks, real estate, company ownership, money for unpaid arrears, and any tangible things of commercial value you possess. Please notice that there are things that cannot be distributed in the will, such as shared and living will assets and life insurance.
    7. Ask witnesses to sign the document. In accordance with the Kansas Statute, for any last will to be valid, it has to be signed by two witnesses. Only a person who isn’t your beneficiary and is of 18 years or more could be picked as a witness. Think about selecting witnesses who are younger than you to make sure that they will be around in the event the will is contested in court or if some other problem arises.After a complete review of every paragraph in your last will and testament, all signatories (you and the two witnesses) must write their names and full addresses and sign the paper.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between 'Power of Attorney' and 'Executor'?


The primary distinction between these two documents is that when you have passed away, the person you assign via power of attorney loses their official authority to handle any matters for you.

Among many power of attorney types, the two following ones are viewed as fundamental:

  • General power of attorney – lets you name a proxy (agent) who will have the ability to handle your financial and legal matters on your behalf. But, this document becomes invalid in case the principal passes away or becomes incapacitated.
  • Durable power of attorney – grants the same authority to the proxy as the prior type but continues to be effective even when the person on behalf of whom the agent acts becomes incapacitated.

An executor is a person you trust and assign to be sure the will’s instructions are performed. You may appoint one person to act as an attorney-in-fact and will executor.

Is last will notarization needed by Kansas statute?


In Kansas, it’s not necessary to attest your will. But, you will need a notary public if you would like to make your last will self-proving by attaching an affidavit to it. Making your will self-proving might be a good choice since it expedites the probate and gives an extra layer of certainty in case the will’s credibility is questioned.

IMPORTANT: Even though notarization is not required for last wills in Kansas, signing a will in front of a notary public usually helps facilitate the probate.

Should you go for an attested or holographic will?


For any holographic will to become legally binding, you must handwrite the entire document, indicate the date of writing, put your signature on it, and have it witnessed according to the state law. But, such last wills are frequently regarded as a temporary solution. You would like to upgrade this kind of a last will by creating an attested one whenever you can by getting a lawyer’s expertise or a fillable form. An adequately outlined will would be far better for the future probate procedure since holographic wills may have ambiguous conditions that can easily slow down probate and make it more costly and/or harder to impose.

An attested last will is a typewritten document that is usually based on a fillable form obtainable online or created through the help of a legal professional. You would need to have two witnesses (18 years or more) sign the last will and testament in your presence for it to be regarded as valid. In certain states, you would have to notarize it, but in Kansas, there’s no such requirement.

Exactly what does it imply to be testamentary capable?


The testator has to fulfill testamentary capacity requirements to be able to write and modify their last will, including being of sound mind.

Usually, in most states, to create a last will and testament, you ought to be of sound mind and at least 18 years old. “Sound mind” means that you don’t have any type of mental illnesses (dementia, senility, insanity, etc.) that prevents you from having an understanding of the outcomes of your doings.

In Kansas, will I need a self-proving affidavit?


It is not strongly necessary in Kansas. However, if you choose to add a self-proving affidavit, it can be quite useful since this document acts as a substitute for in-court testimony of witnesses in the course of probate.

Can you leave out your children or spouse from a last will?


In Kansas, there is no such a thing as community or marital property. That means that all the possessions acquired or improved in the marriage are not required to be equally shared between the two spouses. Kansas law allows disinheriting your marriage partner. Still, your spouse will be admitted to possessing a particular minimum amount of your property.

In 2018, the Kansas divorce rate was a bit higher than the average divorce rate in the USA (8.6 in comparison to 7.7 per 1,000 women over 15 years old), according to Census.gov.


Besides your husband or wife, Kansas law enables you to disinherit any other members of your family. By including particular disinheritance paragraphs to your last will and testament, you’ll be able to cut off your adult children or other members of the family from obtaining any of your belongings.

Can my last will be modified without my agreement?


It is not possible. Only the testator can change his or her will. Another person is only able to sign the last will and testament when you are physically incapable f doing it.

Can I modify a typewritten last will after signing it (in Kansas)?


Yes, it is possible.

A person who wrote the will can alter or cancel their will anytime. The only case that may not allow you to do so is when this action is outlawed under the contract you entered.

Additionally, it’s a good idea to review your last will and testament if you undergo a major life event such as:

  • A child has been adopted or born
  • You have divorced or married
  • Real estate or a major piece of property has been sold or bought
  • Fundamental changes in your money situation

What will be the consequences of losing a last will and testament?


In case the last will and testament has been lost or damaged, in line with Kansas law, the court can admit it. However, the probate court will be not likely to accept anything except for the initial version of the last will to probate.

Based on Kansas law, the will’s absence is regarded as its revocation. This suggests that the trustee will need to provide evidence of the will’s validity, which in turn might be found to be quite complicated.

For a holographic will, you will need sworn witnesses and testimony to show. This will make things even more troublesome. In addition to that, you are also to provide evidence of why the last will and its contents cannot be delivered in ways that will also prove it has not been annulled.

In what way does a physically impaired individual sign his or her last will and testament?


Based on the Kansas Estate Code, it’ll be possible for an individual to sign his or her will, providing it is your (as a testator) instruction and with you present. It is possible to give a special directive by several means, which include voice communication, a positive answer to a question, or body gestures.

It is possible to get a notary to sign the name of a testator who is physically unable to do so in case the testator guides the notary public in the presence of a witness. It is important to note that these witnesses cannot have an interest (equitable or legal) in any properties and assets that are the subject or might be influenced by this document (the will).

Related documents Download When to create it
Codicil DOCX, ODT, PDF There are a few minor adjustments you would like to make to your last will.
Self-proving affidavit DOCX, ODT, PDF You want to save time and money for your will’s witnesses.
Living will DOCX, ODT, PDF You would like to be sure your end-of-life treatment is carried out in line with your wishes.
Living trust DOCX, ODT, PDF You want to skip probate by putting your assets in the possession of a trust.
Published: Sep 16, 2020